making the shot count…

Photo by Larry Acord. Al Q and good friend Jeff DeBrown of Reel Baja Outfitters, holding a grande roosterfish caught off the beach on fly estimated between 65 and 75 pounds. July 2019

As you know we practice casting all the time. We try to recreate real life experiences and challenges; like windy day casting, or getting your fly to lay out straight at 80 feet so when you strip your fly you can set the hook at a distance. Not that you have to cast 80 feet but it is nice to know you can and trust me most fish are caught with accurate cast between 20 and 60 feet. So why do we practice? We practice so we are ready for the opportunity to catch a fish of a lifetime. Well personally, I enjoy the comments we get when people pass by the park as we are casting on the grass and they give you that funny look, and ask, “How’s the fishing or Have you caught anything latey? LOL. If they only knew and saw the big picture.  Well, the Fly Zone is not just a class, it is an attitude, it’s the ability to learn so you can correct your own casting problems, it’s the ability to have confidence in your own ability so you can make a great shot under pressure or sheer excitement. We all want to improve, me included, have fun and enjoy our time on the water. The roosterfish above is an example of staying in the moment, making a good cast and creating my own luck. You never know when a fish of a lifetime will track and eat your fly in gin clear water about four feet off the beach. Tight lines!

-Al Q

the power stroke…

Check out Fly Zone’s Jim Solomon releasing on the forward stroke. Watch how far back he gets his hauling hand prior to the release. Everything matters when it comes to distance, one small error in the system and all the forward energy gets interrupted. This is poetry in motion…. – Al Q

a picture is worth…

titano_first-fish
After a few sessions with the Fly Zone, Titano Cruz got to try his hand at some saltwater flyfishing this past Monday with John Whitaker and Al Q. T made a nice cast, soaked the fly, stripped, fought and landed his FIRST fly caught fish on fly, a spunky calico bass. WTG dude, looks like you didn’t enjoy it too much…lol Photo by Al Quattrocchi

only the shadow knows…

IMG_6775

It is a good idea to check your back cast. Good back loops are the key to a successful presentation. A knowledgeable casting companion is worth their weight in gold. However, most of the time we are casting by ourselves. Watching your back cast is great but it is not a great habit to develop.  I like to watch my shadow and snap some photos of it. A picture is worth a thousand words and certainly not “fake news”. Pinch your fly line on the rod and use your non casting hand to snap a photo right when you stop the rod on the back cast. It is a little tricky but if I can do it, so can you!  – Jim Solomon